Daughters are meant to depend on their mothers for support when they need encouragement to thrive in life. But the most complex situations daughters will face can become even more problematic if they don’t have unrelenting approval from their parent. Oxygen’s new television series, ‘Fix My Mom,’ explores these complicated dynamics, as it follows five vibrant mother-daughter pairs who are pushed beyond their comfort zones.

To show that these children and their parents are determined to make a final effort to salvage the relationships they hold most dear, Shockya is premiering an exclusive clip from tonight’s series premiere of ‘Fix My Mom.’ Life coach Laura Baron, who appears on the reality show in an effort to help women overcome their issues with their moms, has also generously discussed her experiences on the series in an exclusive interview.

In each episode of ‘Fix My Mom,’ the mothers and daughters are put to the test through specifically designed challenges aimed at getting to the root of their issues. With Baron’s guidance, the ladies embark on a rollercoaster journey together in hopes of mending their broken bonds before the damage becomes irreparable.

Baron first explained how she became a Relationship Expert who specializes in women’s empowerment. “I was always sensitive and felt deeply connected to other’s emotions, but it was other people who molded me to become a coach,” she revealed. “When I was 12, another 12-year-old girl called me to tell me she was going to commit suicide, and I found myself comfortably talking her down. It was the first moment I understood how all of that sensitivity could truly benefit others, and from that point on, I dedicated myself (to helping others.”

The Life Coach added that she was drawn to help mothers and daughters mend their broken relationships on ‘Fix My Mom’ because she likes to do anything she can “to both help families and women individually. Plus, I had the benefit of already having a working relationship with (the show’s production company,) Bunim Murray and Oxygen. So I trusted their intentions in rebuilding relationships and building stronger communities.”

Having close relationships with both her own mother, who’s a former Peace Corps volunteer, and grandmother, who’s a women’s rights activist, influenced the way Baron views women’s empowerment, as well as her approach in working with her clients. “I come from a family of tough love, and it’s exactly what I give,” the Relationship Expert divulged. “Although it may be tough, it’s always given and always based in love. My mom and my grandmother have always inspired me to reach out and do whatever it is I can to help.”

But Baron has faced some challenges while working with mothers and daughters, particularly while working on ‘Fix My Mom?’ “The beauty of the women who participated in this program is that they are honest and open about every aspect about their relationship,” she said. “They are absolutely reflective of the natural struggles between mothers and daughters, and they are amazing. One of the greatest themes you’ll see in ‘Fix My Mom’ is a mother’s difficulty to separate her identity from her daughter’s (identity). The daughters now have an ability to stand up as empowered young women, as opposed to (staying in) the (repressed) role they’ve been inside their family.”

While filming ‘Fix My Mom,’ the Life Coach helped the show’s participants face their truths of their mother-daughter connections, and also improve their bonds, by providing “customized private sessions and group sessions…I partnered with some of the best producers in the industry to help create the most intense, revealing and potentially (if they chose) healing journey,” she said.

Before working to rebuild mother and daughters’ relationships on ‘Fix My Mom,’ Baron previously appeared on several other reality shows, including Oxygen’s ‘Bad Girls Club.’ She feels it’s important to offer her insight into how people can improve their lives through such diverse reality shows, because she has “always sought out to work with diverse populations. I believe anyone who wants to grow should have that opportunity. TV gives me the platform to work with and hopefully help limitless people.”

Baron’s work in her private practice does influence the way she approaches working with the participants she coaches on the reality shows she works on. “In private practice, I work with successful individuals who have high expectations and little time. They demand pretty immediate results and I deliver,” she revealed. “My approach, no matter with whom or where I work, is always tailored to the person in front of me. I am hard driving and intense, but always first try to come from a place of compassion.”

The relationship expert also added that she hopes ‘Fix My Mom’ can be an example to women, particularly in helping mothers and daughters. “I don’t see ‘Fix My Mom’ as much of a television show as I see it as a movement. (It’s a) call for every woman to start supporting one another…if we did, imagine the possibilities. I will always do whatever I can to inspire that.”

‘Fix My Mom’ will premiere tonight at 9pm ET/PT on Oxygen. It will then air weekly in the same time slot, beginning on November 10. The show is executive produced by produced by Gil Goldschein, Julie Pizzi, Sean Rankine, Dave Rupel and Mark Seliga. Viewers can connect with Baron on her official Twitter page.

Watch Shockya’s exclusive clip from tonight’s series premiere of ‘Fix My Mom’ below.

Fix My Mom with Laura Baron in Exclusive Clip for Oxygen TV's Reality Show Series Premiere
Life Coach and Relationship Expert Laura Baron, who appears on Oxygen TV’s ‘Fix My Mom.’

Written by: Karen Benardello

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By Karen Benardello

As a graduate of LIU Post with a B.F.A in Journalism, Print and Electronic, Karen Benardello serves as ShockYa's Senior Movies & Television Editor. Her duties include interviewing filmmakers and musicians, and scribing movie, television and music reviews and news articles. As a New York City-area based journalist, she's a member of the guilds, New York Film Critics Online and the Women Film Critics Circle.

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